Quick Superfood Recipes: 4 Ingredient Zucchini Tater Tots What ingredients come to mind when someone says, “tater tots”? Taters, of course. How about zucchini? No? Well, that’s about to change. This vegan recipe is healthy, gluten-free, and tastes amazing. It only takes four ingredients and you probably have them in your kitchen right now.

Why Is Vitamin E Important to Your Health? Vitamin E, also known as tocopherol, is a fat-soluble vitamin that plays a significant role in human health.[1] As an antioxidant, vitamin E helps maintain healthy cells and, subsequently, a healthy body. Vitamin E can also help with poor eyesight[2], gout[3], and arthritis.[4] Today, we’ll look at key roles vitamin E plays within the body.

11 Selenium Toxicity Dangers You Can Easily Avoid Selenium is an essential nutrient that the human body requires in order to function normally. And, like all nutrients, selenium can reach a point where enough becomes too much and it begins to hurt rather than help. Your body needs what it needs; more isn’t necessarily better. In fact, if you consume too much selenium, you can experience selenium toxicity, also known as selenium poisoning. As you might guess, this is the presence of too much selenium in the body.[1]

Try This Raw Vegan Raspberry Vanilla Cashew Cream Recipe Cashew cream is a smooth, delicious food that can be enjoyed in a variety of ways. Depending how it's made, it can be either savory or sweet, which makes it incredibly versatile. It’s the perfect dip for fruit. Use it to flavor smoothies or add a cashew cream layer to parfaits. It even works wonders for thickening soup. Cashew cream makes a delicious, vegan-friendly mayonnaise substitute and can be used to make spreadable vegan cheese. I make cashew cream nearly every single week.

What Are the Wellness Benefits of N-acetylcysteine? Cysteine is an amino acid that the body is able to transform into antioxidants like glutathione.[1] N-acetylcysteine, also commonly called acetylcysteine, is a form of cysteine that has been specially modified.[2] While cysteine is available in many high-protein foods, such as chicken, turkey, pork, and dairy, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is not actually found in any food.[3] Rather, N-acetylcysteine is generally consumed as a capsule or administered intravenously.[4]
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